Tuesday, December 18, 2007

Top Ten Pediatric CME for 2007

Top Ten Pediatric CME for 2007 (Medscape for WebMD)

1
Applying New NIH Guidelines for Pediatric Asthma: An Infant Who Has Failed Previous Asthma Therapy CME
2
Noonan Syndrome: What Physicians Need to Know CME
3
Statement From USPSTF: Screening for Iron Deficiency Anemia -- Including Iron Supplementation for Children and Pregnant Women CME/CE
4
Spotting Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever in Children CME
5
Vaccine Update CME/CE
6
Cases From AHRQ WebM&M: Rapid Mis-St(r)ep CME/CE
7
Neonatal Emergencies CME/CE
8
Challenges to the Management of Pediatric Asthma CME
9
A Better Way to Vaccinate Children Against the Flu? CME/CE
10
Vitamin C May Be Effective Against Common Cold Primarily in Special Populations CME/CE


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2 Comments:

Blogger pearlie said...

Vitamin C May Be Effective Against Common Cold Primarily in Special Populations

I tried scanning the article but no luck - so who are in the special populations they are referring to?

12:49 PM  
Blogger Unknown said...

Prophylactic vitamin C had no effect on common cold incidence:
Of 11,350 subjects, 6135 subjects used vitamin C for 2 weeks to 5 years.
Pooled RR for cold infection was 0.96 (95% CI, 0.92 - 1.00).
Subgroup analysis of 6 studies showed decreased cold incidence in subjects with extreme physical or cold stress or both (marathon runners, skiers, soldiers in subarctic exercise; RR, 0.50; 95% CI, 0.38 - 0.66).

Prophylactic vitamin C decreased duration of common cold:
In 7242 illness episodes in adults, pooled decrease in duration was 8.0% (95% CI, 3.0% - 13.1%).
In 2434 illness episodes in children, pooled decrease in duration was 13.6% (95% CI, 5.6% - 21.6%).

Prophylactic vitamin C slightly and inconsistently decreased severity of common cold:
Severity measured as days confined indoors or off from work or school decreased (P = .02).
Severity measured as symptom severity score did not decrease.
Pooled severity, measured as days off and symptom score, decreased (P = .004).

Treatment with vitamin C after onset of common cold did not decrease duration of symptoms in data from 3294 illness episodes:
In 1 study, illness duration of only 1 day was more common with vitamin C at 8 g/day vs 4 g/day (46% vs 39%; P = .046) and illness duration was shorter if treated with vitamin C within 24 hours of illness vs with other medications (3.6 vs 6.9 days).

Treatment with vitamin C after onset of common cold did not decrease severity of symptoms in data from 2753 illness episodes.


The effects of oral prophylactic vitamin C on the common cold include decrease in duration, especially in children; slight decrease in severity; and no decrease in incidence, except for a subgroup of persons exposed to extreme cold or physical stress.

Vitamin C treatment of the common cold has no significant effect on duration or severity of illness.

3:38 PM  

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